Insane Datsun 240Z of Destruction – FMV258

FIREBALL MALIBU VLOG 258. Fireball heads to Ventura Cars & Coffee, spots some serious Datsun Love. Then reveals a crazy week. SHARE Today’s Vlog!

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ABOUT: Automotive-Hollywood Vlog Series FIREBALL MALIBU VLOG chronicles the awesome daily CAR LIFE of Hollywood Car Design Legend Fireball Tim Lawrence and his Bride (Mascot Builder-Sculptor & Surfer) Kathie Lawrence in celebrity haven, MALIBU, Ca. Amazing CARS, Celebrity Interviews, Car Shows, Car Design, Hollywood, Travel, Surfing, Sand and a Healthy Beach Lifestyle. Yes, all at once.

GET FEATURED ON THE VLOG! Do you want us to feature your products or car on the Vlog? Send Mail To… 23838 PCH #742 Malibu Ca 90265 or email Fireball @ askfireball@fireballtim.com

BOOKS! Fireball Tim’s Hollywood Design Books on AMAZON here! Movie Cars, Concepts, MINIs, Wacky States & Cartoons! http://tinyurl.com/kh6do5p

Designer of the Day… RON COBB

Got to work with Ron on CATS & DOGS…

Ron Cobb (born 1937) is an American cartoonist, artist, writer, film designer, and film director.

By the age of 18, with no formal training in graphic illustration, Cobb was working as an animation “inbetweener” artist for Disney Studios in Burbank, California.

He progressed to becoming a breakdown artist on the animation feature Sleeping Beauty (1959). (This was the last Disney film to have cels inked by hand.)

After Sleeping Beauty was completed in 1957, Disney laid off Cobb and he spent the next three years in various jobs — mail carrier, assembler in a door factory, sign painter’s assistant — until he was drafted in 1960 into the US Army.

For the next two years he delivered classified documents around San Francisco, then, after signing up for an extra year to avoid assignment to the infantry, was sent to Vietnam in 1963 as a draughtsman for the Signal Corps.

On his discharge, Cobb began freelancing as an artist. He began to contribute to the Los Angeles Free Press in 1965.

Edited and published by Art Kunkin, the Los Angeles Free Press was one of the first of the underground newspapers of the 1960s, noted for its radical politics.

Cobb’s editorial/political cartoons were a celebrated feature of the Freep, and appeared regularly throughout member newspapers of the Underground Press Syndicate.

However, although he was regarded as one of the finest political cartoonists of the mid-1960s to early 1970s, Cobb made very little money from the cartoons and was always looking for work elsewhere.

Among other projects, Cobb designed the cover for Jefferson Airplane‘s 1967 album, After Bathing at Baxter’s.

He also contributed design work for the cult film, Dark Star (1973) (he drew the original design for the exterior of the Dark Star spaceship on a Pancake House napkin).

In 1981, Colorvision, a large-format, full-colour monograph appeared, including much of his design work for the films Star Wars (1977), Alien (1979), and Conan the Barbarian (1982), the first feature for which he received the credit of Production Designer.

Cobb has also contributed production design to the films The Last Starfighter (1984), Leviathan (1989), Total Recall (1990), True Lies (1994), The Sixth Day (2000), Cats & Dogs (2001), Southland Tales (2006), and the Australian feature Garbo, which he directed. Cobb contributed the initial story for Night Skies, an earlier, darker version of E.T.. Steven Spielberg offered him the opportunity to direct this scarier sequel to Close Encounters of the Third Kind until problems arose over special effects that required a major rewrite.

While Cobb was in Spain working on Conan the Barbarian, Spielberg supervised the rewrite into the more personal E.T. and ended up directing it himself. Cobb later received some net profit participation.

Cobb also co-wrote with his wife, Robin Love, one of the (1985–1987) Twilight Zone episodes.

Among the most famous film props signed by Cobb are two of the swords he designed for the 1982 film Conan the Barbarian (the “Father’s Sword” and the “Atlantean Sword”).

Cobb’s original drawings of the swords are nowadays used, in cinema merchandising, to mass-produce and sell replicas.

SICK CAR DESIGNS of the WEEK!

Daily WHIPSNAPS…

What are WHIPSNAPS? Just the best dang photos of the coolest cars on the planet. Done.

SECRET MALIBU PEAK! – FIREBALL MALIBU VLOG 584

 

SECRET MALIBU PEAK! – FIREBALL MALIBU VLOG 584… Fireball and Kathie head up a no named trail to a Secret Malibu Peak. Find a Picnic table and a spectacular view. Later, they stand on the edge of paradise. Awesome final INSPIRATIONS from Fireball.

Some cool info on THE SANTA MONICA MOUNTAINS… The Santa Monica Mountains is a coastal mountain range in Southern California, paralleling the Pacific Ocean. It is part of the Transverse Ranges.[1] Because of its proximity to densely populated regions, it is one of the most visited natural areas in California. Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area is located in this mountain range.

The range extends approximately 40 miles (64 km) east-west from the Hollywood Hills in Los Angeles to Point Mugu in Ventura County. The western mountains, separating the Conejo Valley from Malibu, suddenly end at Mugu Peak[2] as the rugged, nearly impassible shoreline gives way to tidal lagoons and coastal sand dunes of the alluvial Oxnard Plain. The mountain range contributed to the isolation of this vast coastal plain before regular transportation routes reached western Ventura County. The eastern mountains form a barrier between the San Fernando Valley and the Los Angeles Basin, separating “the Valley” on the north and west-central Los Angeles on the south. The Santa Monica Mountains are parallel to Santa Susana Mountains, which are located directly north of the mountains across the San Fernando Valley.

The range is of moderate height, with no particularly craggy or prominent peaks outside the Sandstone Peak and Boney Mountains area. While often rugged and wild, the range hosts a substantial amount of human activity and development. Houses, roads, businesses, and recreational centers are dotted throughout the Santa Monica Mountains.

A number of creeks in the Santa Monica Mountains are part of the Los Angeles River watershed. Beginning at the western end of the San Fernando Valley the river runs to the north of the mountains. After passing between the range and the Verdugo Mountains it flows south around Elysian Park defining the easternmost extent of the mountains.

Today’s Wacky State is ILLINOIS!

About ILLINOIS from Wiki…

Illinois is a state in the midwestern region of the United States, achieving statehood in 1818. It is the 6th most populous state and 25th largest state in terms of land area, and is noted as a microcosm of the entire country.[7] The word “Illinois” comes from a French rendering of a native Algonquin word. With Chicago in the northeast, small industrial cities and great agricultural productivity in central and northern Illinois, and natural resources like coal, timber, and petroleum in the south, Illinois has a diverse economic base and is a major transportation hub. The Port of Chicago connects the state to other global ports from the Great Lakes, via the Saint Lawrence Seaway, to the Atlantic Ocean, as well as the Great Lakes to the Mississippi River, via the Illinois Waterway. For decades, O’Hare International Airport has been ranked as one of the world’s busiest airports. Illinois has long had a reputation as a bellwether both in social and cultural terms[7] and politics.

Although today the state’s largest population center is around Chicago in the northern part of the state, the state’s European population grew first in the west, with French Canadian colonists who settled along the Mississippi River in the 17th and 18th century, and gave the area the names, “Pais des Illinois” or Illinois Country a region that was known as part of New France. After the American Revolutionary War established the United States, American settlers began arriving crossing the Appalachians barrier range in the 1810s via the gaps of the Allegheny to boat building centers in Pittsburgh, from Cumberland, Maryland via the Cumberland Narrows pass to outfit in Brownsville, Pennsylvania, from North Carolina and Virginia via the Cumberland Gap to Kentucky and Tennessee, all on the Ohio River.

With the War of 1812 Illinois growth slowed as both Native Americans and Canadian forces often raided the American Frontier. After the war’s end, the federal government re-established forts such as Fort Dearborn (in 1816—now the site is within Chicago) and army patrols west of the Mississippi diminished the threat from Amerindian raids, so settlers were able to move into all of Illinois from the eastern and southern emigrant trails.

Mineral finds and timber stands also had spurred immigration—by the 1810s, the Eastern U.S. had exhausted most timber stands close to the established cities creating a hard felt first energy crisis by the late 1790s, and after 1818 the industrial revolution was being fueled by new canals such as the Lehigh Canal feeding the furnaces of the rapidly industrializing east coast. In the same year of 1818, Illinois achieved statehood and its growth, as yet untroubled by the speed of as yet unrefined railway technology, would be fueled by the new religion of industrialized forward thinking.

After construction of the Erie Canal with increasing traffic and trade through the Great Lakes, Chicago was founded in the 1830s on the banks of the Chicago River, at one of the few natural harbors on southern Lake Michigan.[8] John Deere‘s invention of the self-scouring steel plow turned Illinois’ rich prairie into some of the world’s most productive and valuable farmlands, attracting new immigrant farmers from Germany and Sweden. Railroads arose and matured in the 1840s, and soon carried immigrants to new homes in Illinois, as well as being a resource to ship their commodity crops out to markets. Railroads freed most of the land of Illinois and other mid-western states from the tyranny of water transport; no longer was a location near a river or canal a need to ship bulk goods.

By 1900, the growth of industrial jobs in the northern cities and coal mining in the central and southern areas attracted a new group of immigrants, from Eastern and Southern Europe. Illinois was an important manufacturing center during both world wars. The Great Migration from the South established a large community of African Americans in Chicago, who created the city’s famous jazz and blues cultures.[9][10]

Three U.S. presidents have been elected while living in Illinois: Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant, and Barack Obama. Additionally, Ronald Reagan, whose political career was based in California, was the only U.S. president born and raised in Illinois. Today, Illinois honors Lincoln with its official state slogan, Land of Lincoln, which has been displayed on its license plates since 1954.[11][12] The Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum is located in the state capital of Springfield, and the Barack Obama Presidential Center will be completed in Chicago by 2020.