CHIP FOOSE on the Vlog – FMV287

FIREBALL MALIBU VLOG 287! Fireball heads to WIKD Kustoms to check on the SEMA Packard, then to the shop of Master Builder CHIP FOOSE for cool cars. SHARE Today’s Vlog!

SUBSCRIBE to the CHANNEL! http://www.youtube.com/fireballtim

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MALIBU Best shots of the Week…

Today’s WHIPSNAPS… Fisker, Bikes, RestoMod, Electric, Concept

What’s it like to drive a ’67 LINCOLN? Ask Bruce Willis’ stuntman STUART WILSON!

Being a stunt man is a rough job. If you aren’t getting set on fire, falling out of a building or crashing a car over a cliff, then you’re slacking. So, when stunt man Stuart Wilson was looking for the right classic car to get into, the result was a relaxed, chill open top 1967 Lincoln Continental convertible.

Stuart is currently a stunt man and stunt coordinator, and for the past nine years and 16 films, he has being Bruce Willis’s stunt double. Can you tell? Other than the real bruises, of course. But when he’s not working and risking his life to make Mr. Willis look good, he’s cruising Malibu in this gorgeous behemoth.

“It has the original 462 motor with 27,000 original miles and is a home office reserve car (one of 475),” Stuart said. “The paint is a custom mix based on a Lexus Graphite Grey, but darker with more metallic added. The interior is custom two-tone leather and we changed the 15-inch rims to 20s for a better, more modern look.” And let me tell you, this car screams cool.

It was purchased in a junkyard in Glendora nine years ago and took eight years to complete. Woah. Stuart chose this car because it was his daughter’s favorite and was built specifically for her. It’s super rare and there aren’t many out there. It was built as a driver and can be seen pretty much every weekend going up and down Pacific Coast Highway and recently at my Wheels and Waves.

“I would say that my favorite story in regards to my car would be one weekend while getting coffee,” Stuart said. “A guy was checking it out and found what he believed to be a flaw. He felt the need to point it out then jumped in his beater Toyota Corolla and left.”

Yeah, like I’ve said before, criticism and jealously go hand in hand, but being cool is always being cool. I hate always being the bearer of good news. For Stuart, driving in Malibu is a great way to relax.

“My job, to say the least, is stressful. So grabbing a coffee and cruising in Malibu and appreciating the ocean is the best way to relax.” Ah, and here we come to the whole point. Drive + Relax = Peace of mind. Actually, that’s pretty much the secret “Malibu Way of Life.”

And Stu’s favorite movie car? “There are a lot of great movie cars, but I would have to say the Mustang from the movie ‘Bullitt.’ One of the best car chases ever with a classic car performing at its best.”

I was going to say “Die Hard 3,” but he probably felt some serious pain after that one. You will however, see Stuart in the upcoming “Die Hard 6” — probably on the moon. “Die Hard 6: Die Moon Pie.” OK, my wife actually just came up with that one.

A true champ for doing what you love and appreciating the beauty of Malibu, Stuart Wilson will jump, leap and thump at the chance to relax. I think I’ll join the club. Congratulations, Stu. You’re this week’s Ride of the Week! Now, head to the hospital and get those cuts looked at.

VLOGSPIRATION… VISUALIZE what you want and GET IT!

Here AT THE VLOG, we strive to keep things simple and in 21st century speak. So, words like “dude” may come up from time to time. Like… “dude, this is one of the best techniques for getting what you want ever created.” And although we concentrate on CARS & BEACHLIFE and how to achieve that, some of the Vlog inspiration comes from knowing what you want and focusing on it. This success requires you to concentrate.

So, we want you to know how to do this, so YOU can make your life a weekend too.

When you think of things in the past, images come to mind. Thoughts of what happened. For some, they come in colors or black and white, or just a feeling. Some people say that they don’t visualize at all. But this is only because they have not practiced. Yes, practice is involved just like anything else you want to cultivate. And in order to get what you want, you have to SEE it in your mind first. That’s VISUALIZATION.

But looking into the past is exactly the same as looking forward. YOUR mind can’t tell the difference. If you can see it, then it can be REAL. You’ve tried this before, haven’t you? You call it a coincidence. But, it’s not. Things in your life manifest because you are “thinking of them” consistently over time. If you want to get control of this, then “visualize what you want” instead of focusing on what you don’t.

THE CAUSE. Get quiet. Close your eyes. Concentrate on what you want. See it. Then… the most important part of all? FEEL IT. See the image of what you want until you emotionalize it. That’s the octane booster to make it happen. Do this twice a day for 5 minutes.

THE EFFECT. The Universe will find a way, shifting, molding, putting people together to make what you want happen. This is how I do every project. And then… it manifests.

Don’t waste time visualizing on the negative and thoughts of fear… unless you want MORE OF THAT? Is that what you want? You can only erase negative thoughts by REPLACING them with their opposites.

MORE ON VISUALIZATION? Genevieve Behrend’s YOUR INVISIBLE POWER. A great resource.

The BEST IN MALIBU this week…

We’ve done a lot this week here in town and the rain have caused much beauty in the BEACHLIFE community. This weekend is Wheels and Waves at The Malibu Country Mart so we should have a blast. Hope to see you guys there!

Some neat history of Malibu from Wiki…

Malibu was originally settled by the Chumash, Native Americans whose territory extended loosely from the San Joaquin Valley to San Luis Obispo to Malibu, as well as several islands off the southern coast of California. They named it “Humaliwo”[16] or “the surf sounds loudly”. The city’s name derives from this, as the “Hu” syllable is not stressed.

Explorer Juan Rodríguez Cabrillo is believed to have moored at Malibu Lagoon, at the mouth of Malibu Creek, to obtain fresh water in 1542. The Spanish presence returned with the California mission system, and the area was part of Rancho Topanga Malibu Sequit—a 13,000-acre (53 km2) land grant—in 1802. That ranch passed intact to Frederick Hastings Rindge in 1891. He and his widow, May K. Rindge, guarded their privacy zealously by hiring guards to evict all trespassers and fighting a lengthy court battle to prevent the building of a Southern Pacific railroad line through the ranch. Interstate Commerce Commission regulations would not support a railroad condemning property in order to build tracks that paralleled an existing line, so Frederick H. Rindge decided to build his own railroad through his property first. He died, and May K. Rindge followed through with the plans, building a line starting just inside the ranch’s property eastern boundary at Las Flores Canyon, and running 15 miles westward, past Pt. Dume.[17][18][19][20]

Few roads even entered the area before 1929, when the state won another court case and built what is now known as the Pacific Coast Highway. By then May Rindge was forced to subdivide her property and begin selling and leasing lots. The Rindge house, known as the Adamson House[21] (a National Register of Historic Places site and California Historical Landmark), is now part of Malibu Creek State Park and is situated between Malibu Lagoon State Beach[22] and Surfrider Beach, beside the Malibu Pier[23] that was used to provide transportation to/from the ranch, including construction materials for the Rindge railroad, and to tie up the family’s yacht.[20][24]

In 1926, in an effort to avoid selling land to stave off insolvency, May K. Rindge created a small ceramic tile factory. At its height, Malibu Potteries employed over 100 workers, and produced decorative tiles which furnish many Los Angeles-area public buildings and Beverly Hills residences. The factory, located one-half mile east of the pier, was ravaged by a fire in 1931.[25] Although the factory partially reopened in 1932, it could not recover from the effects of the Great Depression and a steep downturn in Southern California construction projects. A distinct hybrid of Moorish and Arts and crafts designs, Malibu tile is considered highly collectible. Fine examples of the tiles may be seen at the Adamson House and Serra Retreat, a fifty-room mansion that was started in the 1920s as the main Rindge home on a hill overlooking the lagoon. The unfinished building was sold to the Franciscan Order in 1942[26] and is operated as a retreat facility,[27] Serra Retreat. It burned in the 1970 fire and was rebuilt using many of the original tiles.

Most of the Big Rock Drive area was purchased in 1936 by William Randolph Hearst, who considered building an estate on the property. He sold the lower half of his holdings there in 1944 to Art Jones. Jones was one of the prominent early realtors in Malibu, starting with the initial leases of Rindge land in Malibu Colony. He was also the owner/part-owner of the Malibu Inn, Malibu Trading Post and the Big Rock Beach Cafe (which is now Moonshadows restaurant). Philiip McAnany owned 80 acres (32 ha) in the upper Big Rock area, which he had purchased in 1919, and had two cabins there, one of which burned in a brush fire that swept through the area in 1959, and the other in the 1993 Malibu fire. McAnany Way is named after him.