Fireball Design THURSDAY… MEGATRUCKS

Fireball’s concept designs for a toy from KC Lighting…

Snag one of his MOVIE CAR DESIGN books on Amazon…

COOL 1962 CHEVY PICKUP CAMPER TRUCK! – FIREBALL MALIBU VLOG 665

COOL 1962 CHEVY PICKUP CAMPER TRUCK! – FIREBALL MALIBU VLOG 665 – Fireball heads to the Murphy Auto Museum to drive cool cars, snags a 1962 Chevy Pickup Camper Truck! But what makes this truck so cool? It’s got something that most of them didn’t…

The C/K was Chevrolet and GMC’s full -size pickup truck line from 1960 until 2000 in the United States, from 1965 to 1999 in Canada, from 1964 to 2001 in Brazil, and from 1975 to 1982 in Chile.

The first Chevrolet pickup truck was introduced in 1924, though in-house designs did not appear until 1930. “C” indicated two-wheel drive and “K” indicated four-wheel drive.

The aging C/K light-duty pickup truck was replaced with the Chevrolet Silverado and GMC Sierra names in 1999 in the United States and Canada, and 2001 in Brazil; the Chevrolet Silverado HD and GMC Sierra HD heavy-duty pickup trucks followed.

Until this time, the names Silverado and Sierra were used to identify the trim level of the C/K trucks.

For the first Chevrolet C Series, made from 1911 to 1913, see Chevrolet Series C Classic Six (the first Chevy).

The 1960, 1961, and 1962 models used torsion bar front suspensions, with trailing arm suspension rears.

Trim lines were base and “Custom.” Engines included the base GMC 305 in3 V6 for the GMC version, 135 hp (101 kW) 236 in3 (3.9 L) and 150 hp (112 kW) 261 in3 (4.3 L) straight-6s, and a 283 in3 (4.6 L) V8 with 185 hp (119 kW).

RESTORED 1963 CHEVROLET C-10 STEPSIDE TRUCK! – FIREBALL MALIBU VLOG 653

RESTORED 1963 CHEVROLET C-10 STEPSIDE PICKUP! – FIREBALL MALIBU VLOG 653 – A fun day in Malibu lands Fireball and Kathie at niece Alexa’s Birthday, the Pepperdine Ponds, the Beach and a spotting of this fully restored 1963 Chevrolet C-10 Stepside Pickup Truck!

From WIKI… The C/K was Chevrolet and GMC’s full -size pickup truck line from 1960 until 1998 in the United States, from 1965 to 1999 in Canada, from 1964 to 2001 in Brazil, and from 1975 to 1982 in Chile.

The first Chevrolet C-10 pickup truck was introduced in 1924, though in-house designs did not appear until 1930. “C” indicated two-wheel drive and “K” indicated four-wheel drive.

The aging C/K light-duty pickup truck was replaced with the Chevrolet Silverado and GMC Sierra names in 1999 in the United States and Canada, and 2001 in Brazil; the Chevrolet Silverado HD and GMC Sierra HD heavy-duty pickup trucks followed.

Until this time, the names Silverado and Sierra were used to identify the trim level of the C/K trucks.

The 1960 model year introduced a new body style of light pick-up truck that featured many firsts.

Most important of these were a drop-center ladder frame, allowing the cab to sit lower, and independent front suspension, giving an almost car-like ride in a truck. Also new for 1960 was a new designation system for trucks made by GM.

Gone were the 3100, 3200, and 3600 designations for short 1/2, long 1/2 and 3/4-ton models. Instead, a new scheme assigned a 10, 20, or 30 for 1/2, 3/4, and 1-ton models.

Since 1957, trucks were available from the factory as four-wheel drive, and the new class scheme would make this known. A C (conventional) in front of the series number indicates two-wheel rear drive while a K denotes four-wheel drive.

Actual badging on Chevrolet trucks carried the series name system from the previous generation in 1960 and 1961: the 10, 20, 30, and 40 series (C and K) were badged as “Apaches”, 50 and 60 series trucks were badged as “Vikings”, and the largest 70 and 80 series models were marked “Spartans”.

In 1960, C/K trucks were available in smooth “Fleetside” or fendered “Stepside” versions. GMC called these “Wide-Side” and “Fenderside.”

What’s it like to drive a 1950 CHEVROLET RAT TRUCK? Only in Malibu…

You never know what might show up here in the town, automotive-wise. 

People have all kinds of hidden gems stored in garages, backyards and top secret bunkers —but the hunt is on, and I’m the hunter.

Today brings a super cool Ride of the Week from local hair stylist Michael Sparks, co-owner of CIE SPARKS Salon here in the ‘Bu. 

I’ve known Michael for a while now and know that he loves three things more than just about anything: styling hair, cars and surfing. 

Such a bummer way of life, you gotta feel for him. But despite his horribly cool lifestyle, Michael has a great demeanor and an awesome attitude. Right off the bat, as you enter the salon at Cross Creek, he and his team greet you with warm smiles, almost knowing that what they do will improve your self-esteem 10-fold. And they’re right.

But when Michael said he had a cool car, I was intrigued. 

“A 50’s truck,” he calmly remarked with an evil glint in his eye. And in that moment, I knew that a Rat had entered the building.

Cut to Michael rolling up a few weeks later in his 1950 Chevrolet Rat Truck. Chopped, slammed, dented and dirtied, this truck was slicker than shingles. At 350hp, it’s get-up and go is more than enough for PCH and its curves. 

“I purchased the car from a guy on Craigslist back in 2011,” Michael said. “Just really wanted a rat rod and a truck that I could play with.” 

And that’s exactly what Michael got. 

Surfing, being a dad, croozing for surf activity and getting to the Salon. Yes, it’s rough being a spark like this dude. Imagine the struggle he must endure with all that sun, waves and a gorgeous girl on his arm. I feel for you, buddy.

“I love that the car is chopped with a patina finish,” he said. “I would never get the body restored because I just love the way it looks. It’s a rat rod.” 

And since Michael only uses it to roll around Malibu, he gets some cool stories. 

“One time I was pulled over by the police, and I was terrified because of the Jack Daniels bottle I have for my shifter; however, the officer just wanted to look at the car up close,” he said. 

Whew, that was a close one. Next thing you know, cops will want Rat selfies and all will break loose. Zoiks!

Being a lot like Michael in many ways, I can relate the challenges of being a car guy here in Malibu. The “Cararazzi” are everywhere and you can barely get into town to buy Cashew Milk. 

I don’t mean to rant, but you gotta understand the plights of automotive life. You think movie stars have it bad? Not even close, but it looks like Michael has things under control. 

Next up will be a drive for my show and that will be a challenge. But I’m up for it. Michael… are you?

WORLD’S COOLEST TRUCK WHEELS! – FIREBALL MALIBU VLOG 585

WORLD’S COOLEST TRUCK WHEELS! – FIREBALL MALIBU VLOG 585 – Fireball heads to MKW Alloy to pick up wheels for his latest Project Car. And they rock.

Located in Southern California, MKW Alloy was founded in June of 1995, originally exporting wheels from the U.S. to Asia. In October of 1998, the company introduced its line of wheels to the U.S. market, firmly establishing itself as the market leader within the large diameter chrome marketplace. An innovator in the ‘ultra-big’ diameter SUV market, MKW was first to launch a 26” wheel in 2004. The company continues its global reach and currently distributes four separate divisions of cast aluminum wheels ranging from upscale to niche applications. MKW’s City of Industry headquarters houses a warehouse, and 8,000-square feet dedicated to administration, sales, marketing and design. MKW Wheels

Since its inception, MKW Wheels team have exceeded expectations of their customers. Catering to the increasing demand for high quality aftermarket products, MKW Wheels provides the market with its own design and forward thinking designs and sizes for today’s educated wheel consumers. Customers who wish to enhance the look and performance of their on and Off-road machines trust MKW Wheels to deliver on both quality and price.

MKW employees reflect our passion for product enthusiasm and engineering as well as performance and aesthetic design. By forging ahead with new innovative design ideas MKW is sure to set the pace in the ever growing market for quality aftermarket wheels.

For more info on MKW wheels please visit www.mkwwheels.net

What’s it like to drive a 410HP FIRE TRUCK?

I’m super excited to bring you this one, folks. As I was perusing possibilities for this week’s Ride, we were all set to vlog an episode Malibu Engine 70 driver, Joe Segreto. Right then and there it dawned on me that Joe and his 410-horsepower KME Predator fire engine were perfect candidates. 

So, may I present to you some serious Malibu awesomeness?

As we took a ride up through Malibu with Joe and his team of fire fighters during the shoot, I was humbled to experience just how humble these guys actually were. They’ve seen things that most of us would cringe at. But as with most firemen I’ve met, they were not only the nicest guys on the planet but a hoot to be around. And who wouldn’t be, driving this Caterpillar powered behemoth. 

With an air-to-air turbo and at 893 cubic inches, the Predator weighs in at just over 42,000 pounds. And that’s without equipment, baby. The motor is also equipped with a road and main pump that are both made by Hale. That means that it sprays some serious water.

“This engine is everything to our team,” Segreto said. “It gets us to and from all of our calls. On fires with the main pump engaged, it has the capability to pump up to 1500 gallons per minute of water. On brush fires with the road pump engaged it can produce over 300-psi for long hose lays.” 

The engine can receive water from multiple water sources, such as another engine, a hydrant or it can draft from a pool or lake if needed. That’s the cool part. It also is their shield on accidents. Ok, maybe that’s the cool part, too. 

There isn’t just one function that this fire engine is primarily used for. It has multiple functions that are used in every unique situation that these boys get themselves into. It’s an incredible machine. 

“When I first came to Malibu I was not used to driving an engine around the area,” Segreto said. “We went up Rambla Pacifico and started traveling down some very narrow roads with the cliffs on my side and rocks on the captain’s side. I kept telling the captain that we would not fit, but he just laughed and said keep going. At one point, I thought we were going to go over. Never the less, we made it and he got a kick out of it.” 

And what does Segreto think of being a fireman here in the Bu? 

“Malibu is beautiful: the beaches and views are breathtaking,” Segreto said. “But, what I love most are the residents. They truly make us feel appreciated for the work that we do.” 

Way to go, Malibuites. Engine 70 literally just drove by me with sirens blaring as I wrote this. Wow. Makes me feel proud and safe that someone’s out there fighting for what I love. 

And in case you’re wondering what Joe’s favorite movie car is — and I know you are — that would be Corvette Summer. 

“My father had a ‘72 vet with a blown 350 and that movie always reminded me of it. But runner-up would be Smokey and the Bandit.”

Congratulations, Joe! You and Malibu Fire Station 70 are this week’s Ride!

Some info on FIRE ENGINES from Wiki…

A fire engine (also known in some territories as a fire apparatus, fire truck, or fire appliance) is a vehicle designed primarily for firefighting operations. In addition, many fire departments/fire services often employ their vehicles for various other uses including emergency medical services and rescue purposes. The terms “fire engine” and “fire truck” are often used interchangeably but in North America represent different types of vehicles.

The primary purposes of a fire engine include transporting firefighters to an incident scene, providing water with which to fight a fire, and carrying other equipment needed by firefighters. A typical modern vehicle will carry tools for a wide range of firefighting and rescue tasks, with common equipment including ladders, a self-contained breathing apparatus, ventilating equipment, first aid kits, and hydraulic rescue tools.

Many fire vehicles are based on standard vehicle models (although some parts may be upgraded to cope with the demands of the vehicles’ usage). They are normally fitted with audible and visual warnings, as well as communication equipment such as two-way radios and mobile computer technology.