Swing on into Malibu’s WHEELS AND WAVES this Sunday morning…

That’s right, my Wheels and Waves Cars & Coffee event will be at the Malibu Country Mart from 7 a.m.-9 a.m. this Sunday, Aug. 20.

In past months, we’ve had more than 160 cars from all over Southern California converge into Malibu for this brisk morning show. Classic cars, muscle cars, vintage bombs, hot rods, trucks, one seriously massive military vehicle and some crazy rat rods.

Plus, we get the gambit of celebrities and we have been graced (for two hours) with Malibuite Dick Van Dyke. Past shows welcomed Keanu Reeves, Jonathan Banks, Tony Dow and others.

It’s a blessing to be able to create an event where people can share what they love most.

Our 21-mile stretch houses some of the most spectacular cars on the planet and we see them every day. It’s inspiring to pull them together and create a space where we can converse and swap stories of what we’ve seen, heard and built.

We’ve had Dow’s 1965 Corvair premiere at Wheels and Waves after a 50-year hiatus. We’ve watched a hand-built copper and brass rat rod, built by blacksmith Joe Magliato, enter.

We’ve heard a 600-horsepower Porsche built by WIKD Kustoms, who is now restoring Dow’s Corvair! We’ve watched Chuck Schauwecker’s Japanese hot rod called “Rodriguez” glide in, as well as many cars from The Automobile Driving Museum and Murphy Auto Museum.

Personally, I’ll be bringing in something special (a classic truck) from the Murphy this Sunday.

Plus, not only will we be premiering a new sound system from WIKD, but this month’s sponsor is Croftgate Santa Barbara; they make waterless car care products that are awesome.

They will be the reason that the first 100 cars will get free coffee, so be sure to thank them.

As always, I’ll have the “red bag of doom” filled with Hot Wheels where you’ll be able to reach in and hopefully not get bit by something!

The show is expanding from the Malibu Country Mart into the Malibu Village lot where there’s over 500 spaces. There’s plenty of room to house car clubs.

But I would be remiss to not thank those who already attend this awesome show.

Your passion for car culture is keeping it alive and helping it reach new, younger generations. The fun of seeing friends and making new ones expands not only our love of cars, but also of each other.

This is Malibu, and we only do things one way: the cool way.

Want to be featured in Ride of the Week? Send Fireball an email at askfireball@fireballtim.com.

HOW TO WRAP A CAR AT WRAPCON! – FIREBALL MALIBU VLOG 649

HOW TO WRAP A CAR AT WRAPCON! – FIREBALL MALIBU VLOG 649 – Fireball and buddy Greg Gill head to WRAPCON and learn how to wrap a car convention! Plus, some cool interviews with designer Bryan Thompson and The Wrap Institute.

Wrap advertising or a vehicle wrap describe the marketing practice of completely or partially covering (wrapping a vehicle in an advertisement or livery. The result of this process is essentially a mobile billboard.

Wrap advertising can be achieved by painting a vehicle’s outer surface, but an increasingly ubiquitous practice in the 21st century involves the use of large vinyl sheets as “decals”.

The vinyl sheets can later be removed with relative ease, drastically reducing the costs associated with changing advertisements. While vehicles with large, flat surfaces (such as buses and light-rail carriages) are often used, automobiles can also serve as hosts for wrap advertising, despite consisting of more curved surfaces.

Wrap advertising is also used in the magazine and publishing industries.

Until the age of the automobile, train companies were the largest industry to paint company names and logos for distinction on their locomotives and railcars.

The first attempts at using the plastic in commercial applications failed as a result of being too fragile. In 1926, Semon invented the vinyl still used today by introducing additives to PVC that made it flexible and easier to process.

The first commercial advertisement vehicle wrap is thought to have been created for Pepsi Co in 1993, which used vinyl to wrap a bus promoting its Crystal Pepsi product.

It wasn’t long before bus wrap advertising was everywhere and the new form of vehicle graphics trickled down to smaller businesses and consumers. Wrapping whole vehicles was still challenging.

THIS IS DOGTOWN RUMBLE VENICE CAR SHOW! – FIREBALL MALIBU VLOG 643

DOGTOWN RUMBLE VENICE CAR SHOW! – FIREBALL MALIBU VLOG 643 – Malibu Vlogger Fireball and Kathie head to the badass Dog Town Rumble Venice Car Show, check out the Rat Rods, Customs, Bombs and Classic Cars. Then hit the beach in Venice for some swimming shenanigans.

Dogtown Rumble is a Car Show in Venice California put on by the Oddsquad Car Club.

About VENICE from WIKI… Venice is a residential, commercial and recreational beachfront neighborhood within the California city of Los Angeles, located in its greater Westside.

Venice was founded in 1905 as a seaside resort town.

It was an independent city until 1926, when it merged with Los Angeles. Today, Venice is known for its canals, beaches, and the circus-like Ocean Front Walk, a two-and-a-half-mile pedestrian-only promenade that features performers, mystics, artists and vendors.

Venice, originally called “Venice of America,” was founded by tobacco millionaire Abbot Kinney in 1905 as a beach resort town, 14 miles (23 km) west of Los Angeles. He and his partner Francis Ryan had bought two miles (3.24 km) of oceanfront property south of Santa Monica in 1891.

They built a resort town on the north end of the property, called Ocean Park, which was soon annexed to Santa Monica. After Ryan died, Kinney and his new partners continued building south of Navy Street.

After the partnership dissolved in 1904, Kinney, who had won the marshy land on the south end of the property in a coin flip with his former partners, began to build a seaside resort like the namesake Italian city took it.

When Venice of America opened on July 4, 1905, Kinney had dug several miles of canals to drain the marshes for his residential area, built a 1,200-foot (370 m)-long pleasure pier with an auditorium, ship restaurant, and dance hall, constructed a hot salt-water plunge, and built a block-long arcaded business street with Venetian architecture.

Tourists, mostly arriving on the “Red Cars” of the Pacific Electric Railway from Los Angeles and Santa Monica, then rode the Venice Miniature Railway and gondolas to tour the town. But the biggest attraction was Venice’s mile-long gently sloping beach. Cottages and housekeeping tents were available for rent.

The population (3,119 residents in 1910) soon exceeded 10,000; the town drew 50,000 to 150,000 tourists on weekends.

2017 FOUNTAIN VALLEY CLASSIC CAR SHOW! – FIREBALL MALIBU VLOG 635

2017 FOUNTAIN VALLEY CLASSIC CAR SHOW! – FIREBALL MALIBU VLOG – Fireball heads south to be Grand Marshal for the Fountain Valley Car Show and Fountain Valley Parade.

About FOUNTAIN VALLEY from WIKI… Fountain Valley is a suburban city in Orange County, California. The population was 55,313 at the 2010 census. A classic bedroom community, Fountain Valley is a upper middle-class residential area. The Fountain Valley Classic Car & Truck show was started in the winter of 2006.

The 11th Annual FOUNTAIN VALLEY CLASSIC CAR & TRUCK SHOW took place JUNE 24, 2017- held at the FV Recreation & Sports Park-16400 Brookhurst st., FV.

The City of #FountainValley was incorporated in 1957 as the 21 city in the County of Orange. Since its incorporation, Fountain Valley has established itself both locally and nationally as a forward-looking community dedicated to improving the quality of life for its citizens.

The fantastic growth rate which Fountain Valley experienced in the 1960s took place within the framework of a Master Plan adopted before any developments had begun.

As Fountain Valley marches in the next millennium, we can point to our many successes over the past 50 years and build on this foundation to not only provide stability in the lives of our citizens but create the vision for the 21st century.

Fountain Valley is home to Mile Square Regional Park, a 640 acres (2.6 km2) park containing two lakes, three 18-hole golf courses, playing fields, picnic shelters, and a 20-acre (81,000 m2) urban-nature area planted with California native plants, a 55-acre (220,000 m2) recreation center with tennis courts, basketball courts, racquetball courts, a gymnasium, and the Kingston Boys & Girls Club.

There is also a community center and a 16,652sq ft senior center that opened in September, 2005. A major redevelopment of the recreation center and city-administered sports fields was completed in early 2009.

Fire protection and emergency medical services are provided by two stations of the Fountain Valley Fire Department. Law enforcement is provided by the Fountain Valley Police Department. Ambulance service is provided by Care Ambulance Service.

Fountain Valley has two fully accredited major medical centers: the Fountain Valley Regional Hospital with 400 beds available, and Orange Coast Memorial Medical Center with 230 beds, a medical clinic, and an outpatient medical building.

Today is the FOUNTAIN VALLEY CAR SHOW!

Yes, I’ll be there ALL DAY TODAY! It’s the Fountain Valley Car Show! JOIN US! http://www.fvcarshow.com/blog/

Vlogging with CAITLYN JENNER at The Rodeo Drive Concours…

Coming this week on the FMV, Fireball vlogs with Caitlyn Jenner and Bruce Meyer (Petersen Museum) at The Rodeo Drive Concours d’ Elegance.

About Rodeo Drive from WIKI… Rodeo Drive /rˈd./ is a two-mile-long street, primarily in Beverly Hills, California, with its southern segment in the City of Los Angeles. Its southern terminus is at Beverwil Drive, and its northern terminus is at its intersection with Sunset Boulevard in Beverly Hills.

The name is most commonly used metonymically to refer to the three-block stretch of the street north of Wilshire Boulevard and south of Little Santa Monica Boulevard, which is known for its luxury goods stores.

The larger business district surrounding Rodeo, known as the “Golden Triangle,” which extends from Wilshire Boulevard to Santa Monica Boulevard, is both a shopping district and a tourist attraction.

In 1906, Burton E. Green (1868-1965) and other investors purchased the property that would become Beverly Hills, formerly named Rancho Rodeo de las Aguas, with plans for a mixed-use subdivision with a branch of the Los Angeles and Pacific Railway running North on Rodeo Drive before turning west at Sunset Boulevard.

They platted the street that very year, in 1906. By 1907, 75×160 foot parcels on Rodeo were selling for $1,100 each. It became a bridle path in 1912, when the Beverly Hills Hotel was built on a former lima bean field.

By November 1925, similar lots were selling for between $15,000 and $30,000, almost double what they’d been selling for in September.

The central part of Rodeo eventually became a business street with hardware stores, gas stations, beauty shops, and bookstores. In 1958, real estate developer Marvin Kratter bought 48,000 square feet of land at the corner of Rodeo and Wilshire Boulevard from the city of Beverly Hills.
 
The acreage is across the street from the Beverly Wilshire Hotel and Kratter paid something over $2 million for it.