RARE TOYOTA CENTURY V12 LIMOUSINE – FIREBALL MALIBU VLOG 676

RARE TOYOTA CENTURY V12 LIMOUSINE – FIREBALL MALIBU VLOG 676 – Fireball heads to The Automobile Driving Museum for JDM at the ADM, spots an early 90’s Rare Toyota Century V12 Limousine. Then off to a Shelby America event in Marina Del Rey.

The Toyota Century V12 (Japanese: トヨタ・センチュリー) is a large four-door limousine produced mainly for the Japanese market, serving as Toyota’s flagship car within Japan; whilst globally the unrelated Lexus LS series is Toyota’s flagship luxury model outside Japan.

Production of the Toyota Century V12 began in 1967 and the model received only minor changes until a redesign in 1997.

The Toyota Century V12 derived its name from the 100th birthday of Sakichi Toyoda, the founder of Toyota Industries.

The Toyota Century V12 was available with only a V8 engine, the third Japanese built sedan post-war, at its introduction in 1967 until a major redesign in 1997, and is now only available with a Toyota Century V12 built V12, an engine unique to the Century.

Although the Toyota Century V12 Limousine is a premium, full size luxury sedan, it is not available at Japanese Lexus dealerships; it can only be purchased at specifically identified Toyota Store locations.

The logo used throughout is called the Hō-ō 鳳凰 or Fushichō from Asian mythology, representing the Imperial House of Japan.

The exterior styling of the Toyota Century V12 Limousine has, with some modifications, remained unchanged since its introduction, primarily due to its perceived social status as the “preferred vehicle denoting conservative success”.

Its appearance is iconic in Asian countries, usually painted black.

The closest Japanese competitor is the Nissan President, with a similar reputation, although during the 1960s and ’70s, the high market positioning was also shared with the Mitsubishi Debonair.

The Toyota Century V12 Limousine briefly saw other Japanese competitors introduce large sedans called the Isuzu Statesman de Ville and the Mazda Roadpacer (derived from General Motors-Australia products) which were short-lived.

WHAT IS HAPPENING TO THE GEORGE BARRIS BATMOBILE? – FIREBALL MALIBU VLOG 675

WHAT IS HAPPENING TO THE GEORGE BARRIS BATMOBILE? – FIREBALL MALIBU VLOG 675 – Fireball mishmashes an episode today, resulting in something happening to the BATMOBILE & MUNSTER KOACH! WATCH BELOW!

The Batmobile is the fictional car driven by the superhero Batman in American comic books published by DC Comics.

The Batmobile made its first appearance in Detective Comics #27 (May, 1939).

Housed in the Batcave, which the Batmobile accesses through a hidden entrance, the heavily armored, weaponized vehicle is used by Batman in his crime-fighting activities.

The look of the Batmobile has varied over time, but since its earliest appearances, the car has had a prominent bat motif, typically including distinctive wing-shaped tailfins.

Depictions of the vehicle have evolved along with the character, with each incarnation reflecting evolving car technologies. It has been portrayed as having many uses, such as vehicular hot pursuit, prisoner transportation, anti-tank warfare, riot control, and as a mobile crime lab.

In some depictions, the Batmobile is able to be driven unmanned or remotely operated. The car has appeared in every Batman iteration—from comic books and television to films and video games—and has since become part of pop culture.

The Munsters is an American sitcom depicting the home life of a family of benign monsters starring Fred Gwynne as Frankenstein’s monster-type head-of-the-household Herman Munster, Yvonne De Carlo as his wife, Lily Munster, Al Lewis as Grandpa and Beverly Owen (later re-placed by Pat Priest) as their teenage niece, and Butch Patrick as son Eddie Munster.

The series was a satire of both traditional monster movies and the wholesome family fare of the era, and was produced by the creators of Leave It to Beaver.

It ran concurrently with the similarly macabre themed The Addams Family and achieved higher figures in the Nielsen ratings.

The series originally aired on Thursday at 7:30 pm on CBS from September 24, 1964, to May 12, 1966; 70 episodes were produced.

George Barris (born George Salapatas; November 20, 1925 – November 5, 2015) was an American designer and builder of many famous Hollywood custom cars, most notably the Munster Koach and 1966 Batmobile.

RAT RODS on FIREBALL MALIBU VLOG

While Fireball preps more Vlogs, enjoy this RAT ROD PLAYLIST with the best of Dirty, Filthy, Rusty Coolness!

RAT RODS from WIKI…

A rat rod is a style of hot rod or custom car that, in most cases, imitates (or exaggerates) the early hot rods of the 1940s, 1950s, and early-1960s.

The style is not to be confused with the somewhat closely related “traditional” hot rod, which is an accurate re-creation or period-correct restoration of a hot rod from the same era.

Most rat rods appear “unfinished”, regardless of their status, as only the vehicle’s bare essentials are driven. These are built to drive, not exclusively for show.

The December 1972 issue of Rod & Custom Magazine was dedicated to the “beater”, a low-budget alternative to the early car models that were slick and customized.

Due to the beater’s cheap upholstery, primer covering (instead of paint), and lack of chrome or polished metals, it has been considered a progenitor of the rat rod.

The origin of the term “rat rod” is the subject of dispute.

Opinions regarding the term’s origins were based in one of the following perspectives: The term first appeared in an article in Hot Rod Magazine, written by Gray Baskerville, about cars that, at that time, continued to be covered by primer; or, the first rat rod was owned by artist, Robert Williams, who had a ’32 Ford Roadster that was painted in primer.

However, Hot Rod magazine has verified the latter view.

Gray’s use of the term was in relation to “Rat Bikes,” motorcycles that were assembled from spare parts, to be enjoyed and ridden, and not necessarily for the display of the builder’s skills.

It is believed that the term is likely to have originally been used in a derogatory or pejorative sense, as this remains the case among sections of the hot rod community; however, the term has also been adopted in a positive light by other parts of the sub-culture.

BLACK KNIGHTS on FIREBALL MALIBU VLOG

You may know by now that Fireball had a severe Camera Malfunction. So, today it’s the Best Cars in BLACK! CLICK TO WATCH! New Vlogs start Friday including MOVIE CARS, WHEELS AND WAVES & what Fireball’s driving BELOW! a 1938 Hot Rodded Ford Convertible from THE MURPHY AUTO MUSEUM!

About the 1938 FORD… The 1938 recession hurt Ford sales, as did Ford’s continuing of the 1937 cars, including most body panels.

1938 DeLuxe models were differentiated with a heart-shaped grille, though standard models retained the 1937 look.

The fading Slantback sedan design was cancelled for good. Only a V8 was offered, either a 60 hp V8 or an 85 hp V8. A new dash was used, with recessed controls for safety.

The 1938 trucks were finally updated, having continued with 1935 looks. Changes included a vertical oval grille and substantial fenders and bumpers.

ORANGE MUSCLE ON FIREBALL MALIBU VLOG!

FMV has tons of PLAYLISTS covering every kind of car imaginable. But today… it’s THE COLOR ORANGE. PEEL. EAT. DRIVE. REPEAT!

About ORANGE from WIKI…

Orange is the colour of oranges, carrots, pumpkins and apricots.

It is between red and yellow in the spectrum of light, and on the traditional painters’ colour wheel. It is named after the fruit of the same name.

In Europe and America, surveys show that orange is the colour most associated with amusement, the unconventional, extroverts, warmth, fire, energy, activity, danger, taste and aroma, Protestantism, the autumn and Allhallowtide seasons, as well as having long been the national colour of the Netherlands and the House of Orange.

It also serves as the political colour of Christian democracy political ideology and most Christian democratic political parties.

In Asia it is an important symbolic colour of Buddhism and Hinduism.

The colour orange is named after the appearance of the ripe orange fruit.

The word comes from the Old French orange, from the old term for the fruit, pomme d’orange.

The French word, in turn, comes from the Italian arancia, based on Arabic nāranj, derived from the Sanskrit naranga.

The first recorded use of orange as a colour name in English was in 1512, in a will now filed with the Public Record Office.

Prior to this word being introduced to the English-speaking world, saffron already existed in the English language.

Crog also referred to the saffron colour, so that orange was also referred to as ġeolurēad (yellow-red) for reddish orange, or ġeolucrog (yellow-saffron) for yellowish orange.

Alternatively, orange things were sometimes described as red such as red deer, red hair, the Red Planet and robin redbreast.

In ancient Egypt artists used an orange mineral pigment called realgar for tomb paintings, as well as other uses.

It was also used later by Medieval artists for the colouring of manuscripts.

Pigments were also made in ancient times from a mineral known as orpiment.

Orpiment was an important item of trade in the Roman Empire and was used as a medicine in China although it contains arsenic and is highly toxic.

It was also used as a fly poison and to poison arrows. Because of its yellow-orange colour, it was also a favourite with alchemists searching for a way to make gold, in both China and the West.

Before the late 15th century, the colour orange existed in Europe, but without the name; it was simply called yellow-red.

Portuguese merchants brought the first orange trees to Europe from Asia in the late 15th and early 16th century, along with the Sanskrit naranga, which gradually became part of several European languages: “naranja” in Spanish, “laranja” in Portuguese, and “orange” in English.

IS THIS SOUNDFLOAT THE BEST FLOATIE EVER? WE UNBOX IT! – FIREBALL MALIBU VLOG 674

IS THIS SOUNDFLOAT THE BEST FLOATIE EVER? WE UNBOX IT! – FIREBALL MALIBU VLOG 674 – After a Surf Contest at Malibu, Fireball and Kathie unbox the all-new Soundfloat. But is it the best they’ve ever seen? WATCH!