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SECRET #MALIBU MICROWAVE TOWER HIKE! – FMV567

SECRET MALIBU MICROWAVE TOWER HIKE! – FMV567 Fireball and Kathie take the 2017 FIAT 124 to the “Rim of the World” in Malibu, hit the Backbone trail to a secret Microwave Tower. They find bliss. Also, some great inspiration!

From WELIKELA… Have you ever heard of the abandoned relay tower that sits perched high atop the canyons of Calabasas near Backbone Trail? You haven’t? Well, let me introduce to one of L.A.’s coolest ruins.

Now, in terms of history I heard several different things about what “Stunt Tower” may actually used to have been, with some claiming it’s an old AT&T radio tower, while others saying it was part of the NIKE missile defense program or was used by the LAFD as a watch.

You can really find a definitive source online about the origins, but I guess in some ways the mysteriousness only adds to the lore.

Whatever the tower used to be, today it resides as a graffiti torn shell of it’s former shelf, but a shell with an epic panoramic view of Los Angeles County and the Pacific Coast.

As the title of the article suggests, the tower is located on private property and we do not advocate or advise trespassing to access the tower.

This is an abandoned microwave signal relay tower. Part of the AT&T long lines communications network built during the cold war to resist potential WWIII and keep communications flowing.

The AT&T microwave towers were used for both civil and government communications. They were mostly built in the 50s and early 60s, and moved the Bell System’slong-distance communications off of copper wires for a large part of the network. Some communications went over transcontinental cables, others over microwave links. The buildings supporting the towers were hardened against a nuclear blast, and some of them in high-danger areas were underground.

The towers themselves were engineered to withstand all but a close (within 5 miles) blast. The microwave horns were covered with a protective shield to keep out not only the elements, but also radioactive fallout. The buildings were shielded with copper to protect the equipment against the Electromagnetic Pulse associated with a nuclear explosion. Foot-thick concrete walls protected the vital electronics and people inside the base installations of these towers.

Thick copper grounds went deep into the bedrock beneath each tower. Fallout showers, backup generators, sleeping facilities all existed to keep the network up in times of war.

We DRIVE A 1933 STUDEBAKER INDY CAR in FMV566!

We DRIVE A 1933 STUDEBAKER INDY CAR! – FMV566

After an amazing morning at the MONTECITIO CARS & COFFEE, Fireball and his team of misfits head to The MURPHY MUSEUM and drive a 1933 #Studebaker Indy Car!

About STUDEBAKER from Wikipedia… About STUDEBAKER from Wiki… Studebaker (1852–1967 /ˈstjuːdəbeɪkər/ STEW-də-bay-kər) was an American wagon and automobile manufacturer based in South Bend, Indiana. Founded in 1852 and incorporated in 1868[1] under the name of the Studebaker Brothers Manufacturing Company, the company was originally a producer of wagons for farmers, miners, and the military.

Studebaker entered the automotive business in 1902 with electric vehicles and in 1904 with gasoline vehicles, all sold under the name “Studebaker Automobile Company”. Until 1911, its automotive division operated in partnership with the Garford Company of Elyria, Ohio, and after 1909 with the E-M-F Company. The first gasoline automobiles to be fully manufactured by Studebaker were marketed in August 1912.[2]:p231 Over the next 50 years, the company established a reputation for quality and reliability.[3]

After years of financial problems, in 1954 the company merged with luxury carmaker Packard to form Studebaker-Packard Corporation. However, Studebaker’s financial problems were worse than the Packard executives thought. The Packard marque was phased out, and the company returned to the Studebaker Corporation name in 1962. The South Bend plant ceased production on December 20, 1963, and the last Studebaker automobile rolled off the Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, assembly line on March 16, 1966.

HIKE TO THE ORIGINAL M*A*S*H* 4077 TV SET! FMV565

WATCH! Fireball and Kathie hike 2 miles to the original Set for the TV Show M.A.S.H. Yes, still some cars there! Then, Fireball builds a Japanese Ramen Burger!

About M.A.S.H. from Wiki… MASH is an American television series developed by Larry Gelbart, adapted from the 1970 feature film MASH (which was itself based on the 1968 novel MASH: A Novel About Three Army Doctors, by Richard Hooker). The series, which was produced with 20th Century Fox Television for CBS, follows a team of doctors and support staff stationed at the “4077th Mobile Army Surgical Hospital” in Uijeongbu, South Korea during the Korean War. The show’s title sequence features an instrumental-only version of “Suicide Is Painless”, the theme song from the original film. The show was created after an attempt to film the original book’s sequel, MASH Goes to Maine, failed. The television series is the best-known version of the MAS*H works, and one of the highest-rated shows in U.S. television history.

The series premiered in the U.S. on September 17, 1972, and ended on February 28, 1983, with the finale, showcased as a television film, titled “Goodbye, Farewell and Amen”, becoming the most-watched and highest-rated single television episode in U.S. television history at the time, with a record-breaking 125 million viewers (60.2 rating and 77 share),[1] according to the New York Times.[2] It had struggled in its first season and was at risk of being cancelled.[3] Season two of MAS*H placed it in a better time slot (airing after the popular All in the Family); the show became one of the top 10 programs of the year and stayed in the top 20 programs for the rest of its run.[3] It is still broadcast in syndication on various television stations. The series, which depicted events occurring during a three-year military conflict, spanned 256 episodes and lasted 11 seasons. The Korean conflict lasted 1,128 days, meaning each episode of the series would have averaged almost four and a half days of real time. Many of the stories in the early seasons are based on tales told by real MASH surgeons who were interviewed by the production team. Like the movie, the series was as much an allegory about the Vietnam War (still in progress when the show began) as it was about the Korean War.[4]

The episodes “Abyssinia, Henry” and “The Interview” were ranked number 20 and number 80, respectively, on TV Guide’s 100 Greatest Episodes of All Time in 1997.[5] In 2002, MAS*H was ranked number 25 on TV Guide’s 50 Greatest TV Shows of All Time.[6] In 2013, the Writers Guild of America ranked it as the fifth-best written TV series ever[7] and TV Guide ranked it as the eighth-greatest show of all time.

RESTORED 1960 HOLIDAY HOUSE VINTAGE TRAILER! – FMV564

Fireball heads to The Murphy Automotive Museum to check out a 1960 Holiday House Vintage Trailer, drive a 1952 Chevy Pickup and an amazing classic Lincoln Continental! WATCH BELOW!

From TinCan Tourists… David Holmes, President of “Harry and David” (mail-order fruit baskets and gifts) was looking for ways to keep his workers busy during the January to July “off season”. Capitalizing on his life-long interest in travel trailers and modern design, he decided to employ his skilled workers in the production of a new travel trailer with a very modern and daring design. Holmes’ new “Holiday House” travel trailers were based on the standard aluminum skin over a wood frame design, but the overall styling was very progressive and “space age” and a huge departure from the familiar “canned ham” styles being produced by most other travel trailer manufacturers. Holiday House trailer production began at the Medford, Oregon plant on November 2, 1959, and reached full production level in February 1960. For 1960, Holiday House production included 17ft. and 19ft. models as well as a dual axle 24ft model. For model year 1961, the company strengthened the chassis, enlarged the bathrooms and lengthened the 17ft and 19ft models by one foot.

Although well made and very stylish, Holiday House travel trailers were priced higher than most of the competition, so less than 200 units were manufactured for the 1960 and 1961 model years, before production ceased in January 1962. Besides the daring Holiday House with its “Googies” decorations and style, David Holmes is also famous for the super-modern limited-production “Geographic” travel trailer he began designing in mid 1960 as a “Trailer For The Rich”. Designed in conjunction with BMW race car designer Chuck Pelly, the Geographic’s styling was unlike any other travel trailer and was way ahead of its time.

With a price tag of almost $8500, less than 10 of these strikingly futuristic all fiberglass marvels were ever made. Tragically, the original fiberglass molds survived a factory fire on June 17, 1962, only to be discarded in 1985 when the Harry and David company was acquired. Only one Geographic travel trailer survived, and a complete restoration in 2007 retained the original teak woodwork, Norcold refrigerator, Magic Chef oven and dual “fold out” Magic Chef cook tops. In 2010, this lone surviving Geographic was listed for sale for $135,000.

Holiday House trailers were the brainchild of David H. Holmes, President of Harry and David Fruitiers in Medford, Oregon in 1959.

SECRET NAZI CAMP HIDEOUT HIKE is Vlog 563!

Fireball and Kathie start out this Vlog by heading to Murphy Ranch. A Top Secret Nazi Hideout Camp from the 40’s. Then, the 2017 FIAT 124 Spider arrives at the pad.

About MURPHY RANCH from Wiki… The Murphy Ranch is a ranch built in Rustic Canyon, Los Angeles in the 1930s by Winona and Norman Stephens, who were sympathizers of the anti-semitic, white supremacist Silver Legion of America. The owner of record in 1933 was Jessie M. Murphy. Designed as a base for Nazi activities in the U.S., it was intended to be capable of being self-sustaining for long periods. The compound had a water storage tank, a fuel tank, a bomb shelter, and various outbuildings and bunkers. The estate’s main gate was designed by Paul Williams, a well-known African-American architect in the Southern California area.

On Monday, December 8, 1941, the day after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, local police occupied the compound and detained members of the 50-strong caretaker force.

As of 1990, it was abandoned and in a state of disrepair, and covered in graffiti. The site is currently owned by the city of Los Angeles. In early 2016, many of the ranch buildings were demolished, as they were deemed unsafe. A few buildings remain, including the “power house”, an all concrete building that once contained the diesel generators, however, all entryways have been sealed.