Better Call Saul’s JONATHAN BANKS lands on FIREBALL MALIBU VLOG 553!!

JONATHAN BANKS on the VLOG! – FIREBALL MALIBU VLOG 553 – Fireball does another one of his Wheels And Waves Car Shows, this time with special guest Actor from Breaking Bad & Better Call Saul, JONATHAN BANKS!

About Jonathan Banks… Versatile veteran character actor Jonathan Banks was born in Washington D.C in 1947. While growing up he always had an interest in acting and stage work, so decided to pursue a career in entertainment. To this day he is a very accomplished stage actor. While acting in film, he usually plays sinister types or villains. He can be seen in Better Call Saul (2015) as Mike Ehrmantraut.

All Photos: Suzy Demeter

This DATSUN F10 CAMPER is FIREBALL MALIBU VLOG 551!

DATSUN F10 CAMPER! – FIREBALL MALIBU VLOG 551 – Bouncing around LA, Fireball spots this DATSUN F10 Camper at a local REI Store, then later, hikes the Grotto Trail at Yerba Buena again.

About the F10… The Datsun Cherry (チェリー), known later as the Nissan Cherry, was a series of small cars which formed Nissan’s first front-wheel drive supermini model line.

The Cherry featured the front-engine, front-wheel-drive layout. The Cherry line includes the E10 and F10. Nissan’s direct successor was the Nissan March/Micra. Although the third generation of this platform was renamed March/Micra, the “Cherry” name proved popular in Europe, so it was transferred to the larger Nissan Pulsar line for Europe.

In Japan, the Cherry was exclusive to Nissan Cherry store locations. Originally, before combining with Nissan Motors, the Prince Motor Company plan of development was to mass-produce a front-engine, front-wheel drive car, but after the Prince and Nissan merger of 1966, the Cherry was released in 1970 as Nissan’s first front-wheel drive car. In Asian markets there was also a “Cherry Cab” cabover truck model (C20), which was closely related to the Nissan Sunny—it was also marketed as the “Sunny Cab”.

The second-generation Cherry was known as F-II in Japan and “Datsun F10” in North America. It was Nissan’s first front-wheel-drive model to be sold in North America. Four-wheel independent suspension continued to be used. Sales of the F-II were generally disappointing,[1] and the “Cherry” nameplate was retired in Japan after this generation.

The F10 was fitted with three types of inline four-cylinder Nissan A-series OHV engines:

SUPERCHARGED Vitamin B causes VLOGS IN ORANGE!

Orange (colour), occurs between red and yellow in the visible spectrum Orange (fruit), the fruit of the tree species Citrus sinensis Some other citrus or citrus-like fruit, see List of plants known as orange

Orange may also refer to: FIREBALL MALIBU VLOG, as in the coolest Car Vlog on the Planet and pretty tasty.

2017 MCLAREN 570S & YERBA BUENA HIKE is FIREBALL MALIBU VLOG 550

2017 MCLAREN 570S! – FIREBALL MALIBU VLOG 550 – Fireball and Kathie head into the hills of Malibu for a HIKE to the Yerba Buena Grotto, spot a 2017 MCLAREN 570S afterwards!

1939 DELAHAYE TYPE 165 V12 is FIREBALL MALIBU VLOG 549

Fireball heads to the Mullin Automotive Museum in Oxnard California to see some incredible french cars including a concept 1939 Delahaye from the 1939 New York World’s Fair!

ABOUT DELAHAYE from Wikipedia… Delahaye automobile was an automotive manufacturing company founded by Émile Delahaye in 1894, in Tours, France, his home town. His first cars were belt-driven, with single- or twin-cylinder engines mounted at the rear. His Type One was an instant success, and he urgently needed investment capital and a larger manufacturing facility. Both were provided by a new Delahaye owner and fellow racer, George Morane, and his brother-in-law Leon Desmarais, who partnered with Émile in the incorporation of the new automotive company, “Societe Des Automobiles Delahaye”, in 1898. All three worked with the foundry workers to assemble the new machines, but middle-aged Émile was not in good health. In January 1901, he found himself unable to capably continue, and resigned, selling his shares to his two equal partners. Émile Delahaye died soon after, in 1905. Delahaye had hired two instrumental men, Charles Weiffenbach and Amédée Varlet in 1898, to assist the three partners.[1] Both were graduate mechanical engineers, and they remained with Delahaye their entire working careers. Weiffenbach was appointed Manager of Operations, and, with the blessing of both George Morane and Leon Desmarais, assumed control over all of Delahaye’s operations and much of its decision-making, in 1906. Amédée Varlet was the company’s design-engineer, with a number of innovative inventions to his credit, generated between 1905 and 1914, which Delahaye patented. These included the twin-cam multi-valve engine, and the V6 configuration. Varlet continued in this role until he eventually took over the Drawing Office, at 76 years of age, when much younger Jean François was hired in 1932 as chief design-engineer. In 1932, Varlet was instructed by Weiffenbach, under direction from majority shareholder Madame Desmarais, Leon Desmarais’ widow, to set up the company’s Racing Department, assisted by Jean François. Those who knew him well at the factory affectionately referred to Charles Weiffenbach as “Monsieur Charles”.

Two Type 165 cars exist today, both being Paris and New York showcars, identically bodied as streamlined roadsters, finished in different shades of deep red, by Joseph Figoni. Two other Type 165 bodies were designed and built by Henri Chapron, but were demolished during the Second World War.

The government had ordered all private automobile sales to cease in June, 1939, but small numbers of cars continued to be built for the occupying German forces until at least 1942.

1917 STANLEY STEAMER STILL RUNS!! – FIREBALL MALIBU VLOG 548

Fireball and Ken head to the Mullins Museum for CARS & CARRIAGES, spot this 100-year-old STANLEY STEAMER that still runs! Also, great interview with Maureen Magnuson.

1917 STANLEY STEAMER History… Twins Francis E. Stanley (1849–1918) and Freelan O. Stanley (1849–1940) founded the company after selling their photographic dry plate business to Eastman Kodak. They produced their first car in 1897. During 1898 and 1899, they produced and sold over 200 cars, more than any other U.S. maker.[1] In 1899, Freelan and his wife Flora drove one of their cars to the top of Mount Washington in New Hampshire,[2] the highest peak in the northeastern United States. The ascent took more than two hours and was notable as being the first time a car had climbed the 7.6 miles (12.2 km) long Mount Washington Carriage Road; the descent was accomplished by putting the engine in low gear and braking extensively. [2] The twins later sold the rights to this early design to Locomobile, and in 1902 they formed the Stanley Motor Carriage Company.

Early Stanley cars had light wooden bodies mounted on tubular steel frames by means of full-elliptic springs. Steam was generated in a vertical fire-tube boiler, mounted beneath the seat, with a vaporizing gasoline (later, kerosene) burner underneath. The boiler was reinforced by several layers of piano wire wound around it, which gave it a strong, yet relatively light-weight, shell. In early models, the vertical fire-tubes were made of copper, and were expanded into holes in the upper and lower crown sheets.[3] In later models, the installation of a condenser caused oil-fouling of the expansion joints, and welded steel fire-tubes were used instead.

The engine had two double-acting cylinders side-by-side, equipped with slide-valves, and was of the simple-expansion type. Drive was transmitted directly from the engine crankshaft to a rear-mounted differential by means of a chain. Locomobiles were often modified by their owners, who added third-party accessories, e.g. improved lubricators, condensers, and devices which mitigated the laborious starting procedure, and so forth.

A 1917 Stanley Steamer set the world record for the fastest mile in an automobile (28.2 seconds) in 1906. This record (127 mph (204 km/h)) was not broken by any automobile until 1911, although Glen Curtiss beat the record in 1907 with a V-8 powered motorcycle at 136 mph (219 km/h). The record for steam-powered automobiles was not broken until 2009.[5][6]

Production rose to 500 cars in 1917.