LONG LOST 1938 LINCOLN ZEPHYR FOUND! – FMV572

LONG LOST 1938 LINCOLN ZEPHYR FOUND! – FMV572 Fireball heads to the home of Greg Gill who has discovered a long, lost (custom build for the Ford Family) 1938 LINCOLN ZEPHYR once owned by Edsel Ford. Then, nonsensical fun in the 2017 TOYOTA MIRAI Hydrogen Car in Malibu.

About the LINCOLN ZEPHYR from Wiki… The Lincoln-Zephyr was the lower-priced line of mid-size Lincoln luxury cars from 1936 until 1940. The Lincoln-Zephyr and Mercury, introduced in 1939, bridged the wide gap between Ford’s V-8 De Luxe line and the exclusive Lincoln K-series cars. This served a purpose similar to Cadillac’s smaller LaSalle “companion car”, the Chrysler Airstream, and Packard’s entry level Packard One-Twenty.

The car was conceived by Edsel Ford[3] and designed by Eugene Turenne Gregorie. The Zephyr’s V-12 engine was unique in its class, with the LaSalle having a V8 and the Chrysler and Packard straight 8s.

Introduced on November 2, 1935,[3] as a 1936 model, the Lincoln-Zephyr was extremely modern with a low raked windscreen, integrated fenders, and streamlined aerodynamic design, which influenced the name “zephyr”, derived from the Greek word zephyrus, or the god of the west wind. It was one of the first successful streamlined cars after the Chrysler Airflow’s market resistance. In fact, the Lincoln-Zephyr actually had a lower coefficient of drag than the Airflow, due in part to the prow-like front grille on the Zephyr. The Lincoln-Zephyr succeeded in reigniting sales at Lincoln dealerships in the late 1930s, and from 1941 model year, all Lincolns were Zephyr-based[4] and the Lincoln-Zephyr marque was phased out. Annual production for any year model was not large, but accounted for a large portion of the Lincoln brand’s sales. In its first year, 15,000 were sold, accounting for 80% of Lincoln’s total sales.

Production of all American cars halted in 1942 as the country entered World War II, with Lincoln producing the last Lincoln Zephyr on February 10.[5] After the war, most makers restarted production of their prewar lines, and Lincoln was no exception. The Zephyr name, however, was no longer used after 1942, with the cars simply called Lincolns.

The idea of a smaller and more modern luxury car to fill the gap in Lincoln’s traditional lineup was revisited in the 1950 Lincoln Lido (The Lido was the same size as other two-door Lincolns, though[6]), 1977 Lincoln Versailles, 1982 Continental, and 2000 Lincoln LS. The Zephyr name was resurrected in 2006 for the car’s spiritual successor, the Zephyr, which was quickly renamed the MKZ for 2007.

GIANT FLYING CREATURE ATTACKS THE VLOG! – FMV571

GIANT FLYING CREATURE ATTACKS THE VLOG! – FMV571

Okay, so it didn’t actually attack the Vlog, but just hung out hoping to be fed by Kathie and ends up being our Mascot. Just another day in Malibu… plus, PACKAGE & BOX OPENING!!

Leave it to Beaver TONY DOW Malibu CARSHOW! – FMV570

Photo Thumbnail: Scott Martin

Fireball’s WHEELS AND WAVES goes off at The Malibu Country Mart with Celebrity Guest TONY DOW from Leave it to Beaver. An amazing array of Art Center Designers show up including Freeman Thomas (Ford), Frank Saucedo (GM) and Derek Jenkins (LUCID).

About Tony Dow from WIKI… Tony Lee Dow (born April 13, 1945) is an American film producer, director, sculptor, and television actor.

Dow was born in Hollywood, California, to John Stevens Dow, Jr. (1908–1987), a designer and general contractor, and Muriel Virginia Dow (née Montrose) (May 27, 1906 – April 30, 2001), a stunt woman in early Westerns and Clara Bow’s movie double in Hollywood. In his youth, Dow was a Junior Olympics diving champion. He won the role of Wally Cleaver in a casting call with almost no previous acting experience.

Dow acted in the series until it ended in 1963. After that, he appeared in the television series My Three Sons, Dr. Kildare, Mr. Novak (five episodes in three different roles), The Greatest Show on Earth, and Never Too Young. From 1965 to 1968, he served in the National Guard, interrupting his acting career. On his return to acting, he was a guest star in the television series Adam-12, Love American Style, Knight Rider, Square Pegs, The Mod Squad, The Hardy Boys, and Emergency!.[3]

During the 1970s, Dow continued acting while working in the construction industry and studying journalism and filmmaking.[4]

In 1987, he was honored by the Young Artist Foundation with its Former Child Star Lifetime Achievement Award for his role as Wally Cleaver.[5]

Dow’s most recent screen appearance was in the 2003 film Dickie Roberts: Former Child Star.[3]

He has been married to his wife, Lauren, since 1980. They have one child and two grandchildren.

Dow is best known for his role in the television sitcom Leave It to Beaver, which ran in primetime from 1957 to 1963. Dow played Wally Cleaver, the elder son of June (played by Barbara Billingsley) and Ward Cleaver (played by Hugh Beaumont) and the brother of Theodore “Beaver” Cleaver (played by Jerry Mathers).

Fireball drives the HYDROGEN-POWERED TOYOYA MIRAI! – FMV569

Fireball drives the HYDROGEN POWERED TOYOYA MIRAI! – FMV569

Toyota delivers the Hydrogen Powered Mirai to the Fireball Pad… Kathie and Mr. Ball head for Coffee, Plants, a Dog & Malibu Coolness.

About the TOYOTA MIRAI HYDROGEN FCV from Wiki… The Toyota Mirai (from mirai (未来?), Japanese for “future”) is a hydrogen fuel cell vehicle, one of the first such vehicles to be sold commercially.[6][7] The Mirai was unveiled at the November 2014 Los Angeles Auto Show.[8] Toyota planned to build 700 vehicles for global sales during 2015.[9] Cumulative sales by mid-February 2017 totaled 2,840 Mirais in Japan, the United States, Europe and United Arab Emirates.[10] The top selling markets are Japan with 1,500 units and the U.S. with 1,200.[11]

Under the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) cycle, the 2016 model year Mirai has a total range of 502 km (312 mi) on a full tank, with a combined city/highway fuel economy rating of 66 mpg‑US (3.6 L/100 km; 79 mpg‑imp) equivalent (MPG-equivalent), making the Mirai the most fuel efficient hydrogen fuel cell vehicle rated by the EPA, and the one with the largest range.[5]

Sales in Japan began on 15 December 2014 at a price of ¥6.7 million (~US$57,400) at Toyota Store and Toyopet Store locations. The Japanese government plans to support the commercialization of fuel-cell vehicles with a subsidy of ¥2 million (~US$19,600).[12] Retail sales in the U.S. began in August 2015 at a price of US$57,500 before any government incentives. Deliveries to retail customers began in California in October 2015.[13] Toyota scheduled to release the Mirai in the Northeastern States in the first half of 2016.[9] As of June 2016, the Mirai is available for retail sales in the UK, Denmark, Germany, Belgium, and Norway.[14] Pricing in Germany starts at €60,000 (~US$75,140) plus VAT (€78,540).

The Mirai is based on the Toyota FCV (Fuel Cell Vehicle) concept car, which was unveiled at the 2013 Tokyo Motor Show.[16] The unveiled FCV concept was a bright blue sedan shaped like a drop of water “to emphasize that water is the only substance that hydrogen-powered cars emit from their tailpipes.” The FCV has a large grille and other openings to allow cooling air and oxygen intake for use by the fuel cell. According to Toyota, the FCV concept is close in appearance to the expected production version of the car.[17] The FCV size is similar to the Toyota Camry.[18] The FCV range is expected to be approximately 700 km (430 mi) under Japan’s JC08 test cycle.

CREEPY ABANDONED MALIBU HOUSE is VLOG 568!

CREEPY ABANDONED MALIBU HOUSE! – FMV568

Fireball and Kathie do a Malibu Urban Hike into town and discover many weird things including this Creepy Abandoned Malibu House!

SECRET #MALIBU MICROWAVE TOWER HIKE! – FMV567

SECRET MALIBU MICROWAVE TOWER HIKE! – FMV567 Fireball and Kathie take the 2017 FIAT 124 to the “Rim of the World” in Malibu, hit the Backbone trail to a secret Microwave Tower. They find bliss. Also, some great inspiration!

From WELIKELA… Have you ever heard of the abandoned relay tower that sits perched high atop the canyons of Calabasas near Backbone Trail? You haven’t? Well, let me introduce to one of L.A.’s coolest ruins.

Now, in terms of history I heard several different things about what “Stunt Tower” may actually used to have been, with some claiming it’s an old AT&T radio tower, while others saying it was part of the NIKE missile defense program or was used by the LAFD as a watch.

You can really find a definitive source online about the origins, but I guess in some ways the mysteriousness only adds to the lore.

Whatever the tower used to be, today it resides as a graffiti torn shell of it’s former shelf, but a shell with an epic panoramic view of Los Angeles County and the Pacific Coast.

As the title of the article suggests, the tower is located on private property and we do not advocate or advise trespassing to access the tower.

This is an abandoned microwave signal relay tower. Part of the AT&T long lines communications network built during the cold war to resist potential WWIII and keep communications flowing.

The AT&T microwave towers were used for both civil and government communications. They were mostly built in the 50s and early 60s, and moved the Bell System’slong-distance communications off of copper wires for a large part of the network. Some communications went over transcontinental cables, others over microwave links. The buildings supporting the towers were hardened against a nuclear blast, and some of them in high-danger areas were underground.

The towers themselves were engineered to withstand all but a close (within 5 miles) blast. The microwave horns were covered with a protective shield to keep out not only the elements, but also radioactive fallout. The buildings were shielded with copper to protect the equipment against the Electromagnetic Pulse associated with a nuclear explosion. Foot-thick concrete walls protected the vital electronics and people inside the base installations of these towers.

Thick copper grounds went deep into the bedrock beneath each tower. Fallout showers, backup generators, sleeping facilities all existed to keep the network up in times of war.