WOOLSEY MALIBU FIRE MELTS CLASSIC FIRE TRUCK – FIREBALL MALIBU VLOG 867

WOOLSEY MALIBU FIRE MELTS CLASSIC FIRE TRUCK – FIREBALL MALIBU VLOG 867 – Fireball and Kathie head north on PCH into Northern Malibu, discover severe damage to Leo Carrillo, homes and cars including a classic 40’s Fire Truck. OUR BLOG http://www.fireballtim.com

POPSTAR CELLESTE SINGS PROUD MARY MALIBU-STYLE – FIREBALL MALIBU VLOG 832

POPSTAR CELLESTE SINGS PROUD MARY MALIBU-STYLE – FIREBALL MALIBU VLOG 832 – After some Malibu goodness (Leo Carrillo Beach, LAX) Fireball heads to Cafe Habana to see Popstar CELLESTE perform.

FIREBALL DRIVES THE AWESOME MAD HAMMER RAT ROD! – FIREBALL MALIBU VLOG 683

FIREBALL DRIVES THE AWESOME MAD HAMMER RAT ROD! – FIREBALL MALIBU VLOG 683 – After a stint on the Radio Show “Horsepower for an Hour” and lunch at Leo Carrillo in Malibu, Fireball gets a visit from Blacksmith Joe Magliato and his MAD HAMMER Rat Rod.

A rat rod is a style of hot rod or custom car that, in most cases, imitates (or exaggerates) the early hot rods of the 1940s, 1950s, and early-1960s.

The style is not to be confused with the somewhat closely related “traditional” hot rod, which is an accurate re-creation or period-correct restoration of a hot rod from the same era.

Most rat rods appear “unfinished”, regardless of their status, as only the vehicle’s bare essentials are driven.

These are built to drive, not exclusively for show.

The December 1972 issue of Rod & Custom Magazine was dedicated to the “beater”, a low-budget alternative to the early car models that were slick and customized. Due to the beater’s cheap upholstery, primer covering (instead of paint), and lack of chrome or polished metals, it has been considered a progenitor of the rat rod.

The origin of the term “rat rod” is the subject of dispute.

Opinions regarding the term’s origins were based in one of the following perspectives: The term first appeared in an article in Hot Rod Magazine, written by Gray Baskerville, about cars that, at that time, continued to be covered by primer; or, the first rat rod was owned by artist, Robert Williams, who had a ’32 Ford Roadster that was painted in primer.

However, Hot Rod magazine has verified the latter view.

Gray’s use of the term was in relation to “Rat Bikes,” motorcycles that were assembled from spare parts, to be enjoyed and ridden, and not necessarily for the display of the builder’s skills.

It is believed that the term is likely to have originally been used in a derogatory or pejorative sense, as this remains the case among sections of the hot rod community; however, the term has also been adopted in a positive light by other parts of the sub-culture.

EXPLORING LEO CARRILLO BEACH MALIBU! – FIREBALL MALIBU VLOG 630

EXPLORING #LEOCARRILLO BEACH #MALIBU! – FIREBALL MALIBU VLOG 630 – Fireball and Kathie head to north Malibu to explore Leo Carrillo Beach, spot Sea Lions, Birds and some serious waves.

From WIKI… Leo Carrillo State Park is a state park of California, United States, and a component of Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area preserving 1.5 miles (2.4 km) of beach at the foot of the Santa Monica Mountains. California State Route 1 runs through the park, where it intersects with the western terminus of the Mulholland Highway.

The 2,513-acre (1,017 ha) park was established in 1953. It is named for actor and conservationist Leo Carrillo (1881–1961), who served on the State Parks commission.

Leo Carrillo State Park offers swimming, surfing, windsurfing, surf fishing, and beachcombing. Beachgoers can explore tide pools, sea caves, and reefs. Away from shore there is a shady campground and back country hiking trails.

Leo Carillo Beach has been a popular location for photographers and movies. Movies filmed there include Gidget, Grease, 1984’s The Karate Kid, The Craft, Point Break, The Usual Suspects, Inception, Man from Atlantis and Mega Shark Versus Crocosaurus.

In the popular 1970s TV show The Rockford Files, starring James Garner, it was the first season’s opening scene of episode 1 (The Kirkoff Case) airing September 13, 1974.

It was featured in an episode of Huell Howser’s TV series California’s Golden Parks. The beach and cave were featured in the 1959 film”Journey to the center of the earth”

During the final scenes of the Tom Petty’s “Mary Jane’s Last Dance” music video, Petty is seen carrying Kim Basinger through a cave before placing her in the water.